Integrated Plant Genetics Inc.
6911 NW 22nd St., Ste C
Gainesville, FL 32653


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Adding Value to Crops and Foods with Advanced Gene & GRAS Technologies


Tel: +1 (386) 418-3494
Fax: +1 (352) 338-7599

Integrated Plant Genetics



Administrator Access

Research Downloads

The following documentation is provided free of charge for general personal and non-profit use, and may not be duplicated, copied or published without explicit prior consent of Integrated Plant Genetics, Inc. These materials are provided in either Microsoft Word (.DOC), Adobe Acrobat (.PDF) or Microsoft PowerPoint (.PPT) format.

Click on the 'X' in the appropriate column to download the respective file. Some presentations are large files, so download may be slow.


.DOC .PDF .PPT




BioFlorida 2006 Invited Talk by Dean W. Gabriel:
"Engineering Disease Block® resistance in plants"

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Poster presented at 2003 NSF Design, Service and Manufacturing Grantees and Research Conference, Birmingham, AL, January 6-9, 2003: Disease BlockTM: Genetically Engineered Plants with Disease Resistance

- X -
Recent Published Review of Citrus Canker Disease
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Presentation: Xanthomonas Campestris - X -






Research Links:

UF/USDA Biotechnology Risk Assessment Research Data

Cambia Research Institute

USDA National Agriculture Statistics Service

USDA National Agriculture Library

US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)

UC Davis Center for Consumer Research

Council for Agricultural Science and Technology

Virginia Tech Information Systems for Biotechnology


For general inquiries, please send e-mail to info@ipgenetics.com. For web site errors or content issues, please e-mail webmaster@ipgenetics.com.



Copyright © 2001 - 2006 Integrated Plant Genetics, Inc. -- All Rights Reserved





Southern Gardens Citrus announces field trials of genetically modified citrus carrying an IPG DiseaseBlock® gene for resistance to citrus greening





Citrus "Greening" or "Huanglongbing" disease spreads well beyond Florida to now threaten California.

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